UK Finance (uk.finance) Discussion about Finance issues in the UK.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Old August 26th 09, 12:09 AM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.finance,uk.legal
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by FinanceBanter: Aug 2009
Posts: 10
Default O/T: Need urgent advice on where to buy a home for elderly relative

I'm sorry about the O/T post but I can't find any other directly
relevant newsgroups and urgently need advice.

The family homes are no longer suitable for a very close relative of
mine to live in. This relative has very little assets until legal
matters are concluded, which may take years. I will have to chip in
but the immediacy of the matter means that I can't muster more than
50k in savings and borrowings. I know the budget is very small but she
won't be able to take a mortgage given her age and I have found small
homes in rural areas costing that much so I know it is not impossible.

I am looking to buy a new home for her in the UK. I'm looking for:

- A home, preferably with a good sized piece of land to keep her
active in the garden
- Within my budget of 50k
- In a quiet, peaceful and safe rural area (the sort of place where
people leave front doors unlocked)
- Has a low cost of living
- Has good healthcare (where she won't have to drive for miles to the
nearest clinic)
- Has a friendly, large Anglican/CoE community who will take care of
her

  #2   Report Post  
Old August 26th 09, 12:35 AM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.finance,uk.legal
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by FinanceBanter: Aug 2003
Posts: 21
Default Need urgent advice on where to buy a home for elderly relative

"Kristen" wrote in message
...
I'm sorry about the O/T post but I can't find any other directly
relevant newsgroups and urgently need advice.

The family homes are no longer suitable for a very close relative of
mine to live in. This relative has very little assets until legal
matters are concluded, which may take years. I will have to chip in
but the immediacy of the matter means that I can't muster more than
50k in savings and borrowings. I know the budget is very small but she
won't be able to take a mortgage given her age and I have found small
homes in rural areas costing that much so I know it is not impossible.

I am looking to buy a new home for her in the UK. I'm looking for:

- A home, preferably with a good sized piece of land to keep her
active in the garden
- Within my budget of 50k
- In a quiet, peaceful and safe rural area (the sort of place where
people leave front doors unlocked)
- Has a low cost of living
- Has good healthcare (where she won't have to drive for miles to the
nearest clinic)
- Has a friendly, large Anglican/CoE community who will take care of
her


- The moon on a stick.

Put another zero on the price and you'll do rather better. Otherwise you're
basing your pricing on the early 90s.

Budget aside, many rural areas will do what you want. You don't want
out-in-the-wilds rural, you want to be near a town of a few thousand so
it'll have a decent clinic. And there's a _lot_ of choice out there. Choose
an area, look at the prices.

If money is tight, remember lower prices will be for reasons including : no
land, house needs renovation, nasty area, lack of services.


  #3   Report Post  
Old August 26th 09, 01:47 AM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.finance,uk.legal
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by FinanceBanter: Aug 2009
Posts: 10
Default Need urgent advice on where to buy a home for elderly relative

On Aug 26, 8:35*am, "Clive George" wrote:
"Kristen" wrote in message

...





I'm sorry about the O/T post but I can't find any other directly
relevant newsgroups and urgently need advice.


The family homes are no longer suitable for a very close relative of
mine to live in. This relative has very little assets until legal
matters are concluded, which may take years. I will have to chip in
but the immediacy of the matter means that I can't muster more than
50k in savings and borrowings. I know the budget is very small but she
won't be able to take a mortgage given her age and I have found small
homes in rural areas costing that much so I know it is not impossible.


I am looking to buy a new home for her in the UK. I'm looking for:


- A home, preferably with a good sized piece of land to keep her
active in the garden
- Within my budget of 50k
- In a quiet, peaceful and safe rural area (the sort of place where
people leave front doors unlocked)
- Has a low cost of living
- Has good healthcare (where she won't have to drive for miles to the
nearest clinic)
- Has a friendly, large Anglican/CoE community who will take care of
her


- The moon on a stick.

Put another zero on the price and you'll do rather better. Otherwise you're
basing your pricing on the early 90s.


Thanks for your advice. I am speaking to other relatives at the moment
to see if they are willing to provide financial support for the one
that is separating from the family, but at the moment I am
conservatively assuming I'll be the only one willing to help her out.

Even something simple like this will do for an elderly woman with no
family:
http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-...y-8430903.html
Offers in Region of 49,950
2 bedroom chalet for sale
22 Panteidal, Aberdovey, LL35 0RG

I'm currently self-employed so I'm holding a reserve as I expect
additional costs above just buying the house, such as relocation
expenses. My own living expenses off my savings must also be factored
in.

Budget aside, many rural areas will do what you want. You don't want
out-in-the-wilds rural, you want to be near a town of a few thousand so
it'll have a decent clinic. And there's a _lot_ of choice out there. Choose
an area, look at the prices.


Unfortunately I'm not a native Brit so I wouldn't know where to look.

If money is tight, remember lower prices will be for reasons including : no
land, house needs renovation, nasty area, lack of services.


Probably in decreasing order of what I am willing to trade off would
be:
Land size
Lack of services
Renovation work on house
Nasty area

Thanks again for your advice.


Kristen
  #4   Report Post  
Old August 26th 09, 02:08 AM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.finance,uk.legal
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by FinanceBanter: Aug 2003
Posts: 21
Default Need urgent advice on where to buy a home for elderly relative

"Kristen" wrote in message
...

Even something simple like this will do for an elderly woman with no
family:
http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-...y-8430903.html
Offers in Region of 49,950
2 bedroom chalet for sale
22 Panteidal, Aberdovey, LL35 0RG


That's not a house, it's a posh equivalent to a caravan. 50 K for 20 years
lease plus 1.2k/year service charges - not cheap either. And "OCCUPANCY The
chalet may be occupied for holiday use only".

There are places which do caravans for people to retire to. There are mixed
opinions of them - some of the parks are really dodgy, and all are expensive
for what they are.

In the UK, what people think of a house to buy is typically a
brick/stone/block built thing with the freehold (ie not lease). There are
exceptions to this, but that's the norm, especially in a rural area. And
they cost a lot more than that shed.

Budget aside, many rural areas will do what you want. You don't want
out-in-the-wilds rural, you want to be near a town of a few thousand so
it'll have a decent clinic. And there's a _lot_ of choice out there.
Choose
an area, look at the prices.


Unfortunately I'm not a native Brit so I wouldn't know where to look.


For 50K, you're stuffed, unless you do want to go for the genteel equivalent
of a trailer park (some people do like them and are happy in theirs).
However if you can persuade others to help, and/or take on a mortgage, pick
a place. I reckon somewhere like Settle fits all your criteria bar price,
but you'll be looking for 200K or 150K for a place in town.


  #5   Report Post  
Old August 26th 09, 02:32 AM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.finance,uk.legal
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by FinanceBanter: Aug 2009
Posts: 10
Default Need urgent advice on where to buy a home for elderly relative

On Aug 26, 10:08*am, "Clive George" wrote:
"Kristen" wrote in message

...

Even something simple like this will do for an elderly woman with no
family:
http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-...y-8430903.html
Offers in Region of 49,950
2 bedroom chalet for sale
22 Panteidal, Aberdovey, LL35 0RG


That's not a house, it's a posh equivalent to a caravan. 50 K for 20 years
lease plus 1.2k/year service charges - not cheap either.


This relative is about 70 years old. I presume "ground rent" is the
Welsh term for Council Tax as it's dictionary meaning sounds about
right. For future reference, what do "maintenance charges" buy you? A
handyman around if something leaks or utility bills as well?

And "OCCUPANCY The
chalet may be occupied for holiday use only".


Yes, I noticed that but this relative can always leave for January
when she's not supposed to be living there. But of course, I will take
your advice not to go for such a place.

There are places which do caravans for people to retire to. There are mixed
opinions of them - some of the parks are really dodgy, and all are expensive
for what they are.


No, I don't think a caravan is suitable for this relative.

In the UK, what people think of a house to buy is typically a
brick/stone/block built thing with the freehold (ie not lease). There are
exceptions to this, but that's the norm, especially in a rural area. And
they cost a lot more than that shed.


If I dispose of all my assets, sell shares at a loss, withdraw from
bonds and give myself one year's living expenses on savings, I can
probably muster up 200k in a few months. A freehold brick/stone/block
built house is ideal as I intend to hold on to it as an asset.

Budget aside, many rural areas will do what you want. You don't want
out-in-the-wilds rural, you want to be near a town of a few thousand so
it'll have a decent clinic. And there's a _lot_ of choice out there.
Choose
an area, look at the prices.


Unfortunately I'm not a native Brit so I wouldn't know where to look.


For 50K, you're stuffed, unless you do want to go for the genteel equivalent
of a trailer park (some people do like them and are happy in theirs).
However if you can persuade others to help, and/or take on a mortgage, pick
a place.


It would be so much better for everyone if they all enjoyed their
retirement together and in peace but I think this has been simmering
for some time and this close relative has decided that it is time for
her to leave now that all her children have grown up.

I reckon somewhere like Settle fits all your criteria bar price,
but you'll be looking for 200K or 150K for a place in town.


Thanks for your advice and staying awake at this really unsocial hour
in the UK at the moment!

Kristen


  #6   Report Post  
Old August 26th 09, 04:48 AM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.finance,uk.legal
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by FinanceBanter: Aug 2009
Posts: 17
Default Need urgent advice on where to buy a home for elderly relative


"Kristen" wrote in message
...
I'm sorry about the O/T post but I can't find any other directly
relevant newsgroups and urgently need advice.

The family homes are no longer suitable for a very close relative of
mine to live in. This relative has very little assets until legal
matters are concluded, which may take years. I will have to chip in
but the immediacy of the matter means that I can't muster more than
50k in savings and borrowings. I know the budget is very small but she
won't be able to take a mortgage given her age and I have found small
homes in rural areas costing that much so I know it is not impossible.

I am looking to buy a new home for her in the UK. I'm looking for:

- A home, preferably with a good sized piece of land to keep her
active in the garden
- Within my budget of 50k
- In a quiet, peaceful and safe rural area (the sort of place where
people leave front doors unlocked)
- Has a low cost of living
- Has good healthcare (where she won't have to drive for miles to the
nearest clinic)
- Has a friendly, large Anglican/CoE community who will take care of
her


Well Kristen, I am just up to start a new day and doing my usual NG checks
and came across your post and immediate requirement...and I had to smile.

Now you must please tell us, this is a spoof post of which you have already
hooked one other fishy. Or could it be an email from the late 80's/early
90's that has somehow been lost in the ether and just appeared.

If not you/she had better get into the LOOOONNNNGGGG queue of people wanting
such a piece of wonderland.

That aside and I have just thought, we had a garage (one car shed) that sold
in the middle of our city for 50K a couple of years back...but it did not
have a garden, was not rural, was within 1/2 mile of the hospital and I am
sure MUST have been near a church.

Safe hunting...


  #7   Report Post  
Old August 26th 09, 05:34 AM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.finance,uk.legal
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by FinanceBanter: May 2006
Posts: 6
Default O/T: Need urgent advice on where to buy a home for elderly relative

We were somewhere around Barstow, on the edge of the desert, when the
drugs began to take hold. I remember Kristen
saying something like:

I am looking to buy a new home for her in the UK. I'm looking for:

- A home, preferably with a good sized piece of land to keep her
active in the garden
- Within my budget of 50k
- In a quiet, peaceful and safe rural area (the sort of place where
people leave front doors unlocked)
- Has a low cost of living
- Has good healthcare (where she won't have to drive for miles to the
nearest clinic)
- Has a friendly, large Anglican/CoE community who will take care of
her


If you find more than one place like that, let me know first. Everybody
and his dog will want one.
Trouble is, one or two of your requirements are contradictory -Rural and
low COL don't equate very often, unless you're growing your own fuel;
  #8   Report Post  
Old August 26th 09, 05:45 AM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.finance,uk.legal
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by FinanceBanter: Aug 2009
Posts: 2
Default Need urgent advice on where to buy a home for elderly relative

"Kristen" wrote:

This relative is about 70 years old. I presume "ground rent" is the
Welsh term for Council Tax as it's dictionary meaning sounds about
right.
--------------
No, they are different, ground rent is what it says, payment to the person
who owns the land for the use of the land. This has to be paid when the
property is leasehold - the owner of the building doesn't own the land on
which the building stands and therefore has to rent/lease the land from the
person who owns it.

Council tax (properly called community charge) is payment to the district
council to partly pay for local government services. These services include
police, fire, recycling, refuse collection and removal, schools, leisure
centres, park and ride schemes, parks and open spaces, street cleaning,
subsidising of public transport, tourism, museums, social housing grants,
housing and council tax benefits, environmental health and food safety in
pubs, restaurants and shops, planning services, support for voluntary
groups, meals on wheels, facilities for young people, adapting homes for
disabled people, play centres for children, CCTV installation, sports
facilities, issuing taxi licences, flood defences, and many others. The tax
bears no resemblance to the degree of use of these services, it relates to
the value of the property.

I wonder if it is wise for a 70 year-old to take on a large garden, unless
of course she is very fit and likely to remain so for the foreseeable future
and there is financial capacity to buy-in help with gardening as and when it
is required.

Good luck, this sounds like a nightmare to me.


  #9   Report Post  
Old August 26th 09, 06:29 AM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.finance,uk.legal
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by FinanceBanter: Oct 2005
Posts: 239
Default O/T: Need urgent advice on where to buy a home for elderlyrelative

Kristen gurgled happily, sounding much like they
were saying:

I am looking to buy a new home for her in the UK. I'm looking for:
- Within my budget of 50k


You're funny. We like you.
  #10   Report Post  
Old August 26th 09, 07:43 AM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.finance,uk.legal
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by FinanceBanter: Oct 2003
Posts: 57
Default Need urgent advice on where to buy a home for elderly relative


"Kristen" wrote in message
...
.....
This relative is about 70 years old. I presume "ground rent" is the
Welsh term for Council Tax as it's dictionary meaning sounds about
right.


No. Ground rent means you don't own the land the building is standing on,
but rent it from the peson who does. You will pay ground rent on any propety
that is described as leasehold. Freehold property includes ownership of the
land.

For future reference, what do "maintenance charges" buy you? A
handyman around if something leaks or utility bills as well?


It can vary, but normally it only covers the cost of maintaining the common
services. In the case of a residential park, that would be things like the
roads. In a multiple occupancy building, it would probably cover the outer
fabric of the building.

....
No, I don't think a caravan is suitable for this relative.


Don't be mislead by the rather disparaging description of mobile homes as
caravans. This is what some of them look like.

http://wessexparkhomes.co.uk/page/1/...ial-park-homes

....
Budget aside, many rural areas will do what you want. You don't want
out-in-the-wilds rural, you want to be near a town of a few thousand so
it'll have a decent clinic. And there's a _lot_ of choice out there.
Choose
an area, look at the prices.


Unfortunately I'm not a native Brit so I wouldn't know where to look.


If you can, avoid South East England, which means anywhere south and east of
a line from the Wash to the Severn estuary. That area is now considered to
be the domitory area for London, which pushes up prices.


I reckon somewhere like Settle fits all your criteria bar price,
but you'll be looking for 200K or 150K for a place in town.


Thanks for your advice and staying awake at this really unsocial hour
in the UK at the moment!


Given the relative's age, have you considered assisted housing - houses or
flats with a resident warden, who looks after the residents?

There are also assisted purchase schemes, which allow people who qualify to
buy a property in part ownership with a Local Authority or a charity. They
can sometimes be combined with assisted housing.

Colin Bignell




Reply
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Finance elderly home-owner's purchase of flat ahead of house sale John Stumbles UK Finance 37 March 2nd 14 10:06 AM
Very Urgent Required in Analyst Programmer MSS for UAE VAM SYSTEMS UK Finance 0 September 20th 11 05:41 AM
Post Strike - Any Alternatives for getting urgent mail out? Ken UK Finance 7 October 8th 07 11:37 AM
BACS Transfer - how long (URGENT) SmartMobileZone UK Finance 9 April 26th 05 10:30 PM
Buy to Let advice re renting to relative Pat Beardmore UK Finance 4 September 27th 04 10:19 PM


All times are GMT. The time now is 12:18 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2019 Finance Banter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about UK money and finances"

 

Copyright © 2017